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Federal Highway Safety Improvement Program Funding

WSDOT Local Programs administers Washington state's federal safety funds to cities, towns, and counties in the state that use engineering countermeasures/strategies to reduce fatal and serious injury (pdf 78kb) crashes. Our programs include the City Safety Program and the County Safety Program. 
 
Funds come from the Highway Safety Improvement (HSIP) Program, from the Federal Transportation Act, currently known as Fixing America's Surface Transportation Act (FAST). The program requires that states program and spend safety funds according to their Strategic Highway Safety Plan. Washington State's plan is called Target ZeroLearn more about HSIP. 

Other types of federal and state funding programs

City Safety Program

Next call for projects:
No funding is available at this time. The next call for projects will be in early January 2018. Future calls will happen each even numbered year.

Estimated funding: $25 million.

Open to: Cities and towns that had fatal or serious crashes in the five year period from 2012-2016 (the most complete years of crash data). Other organizations may work with a city or town to propose/develop a project.

Project types: Projects must address fatal or serious injury crashes on either of the following:

  • City/town-owned streets in cities/towns of any population.
  • State highways that a city with a population above 25,000 maintains. These are called managed access (not limited access) state highways.

Two subprograms will be available:

Spot location

  • Funds projects at intersections, midblock locations, or on corridors.
  • Projects must be based on crash history and are prioritized/selected using benefit/cost analysis.
  • Examples: Road diets, pedestrian crossings, signal timing, roundabouts, reflective signal backplate tape, high friction surface treatments, etc.

Systematic

  • Funds low cost, widespread, risk-based projects in the entire city/town or over wide areas in the city/town.
  • New for 2018: Cities/towns must submit a local road safety plan to apply for funds.
  • Examples: Rumble strips, guardrail, signing/striping upgrades, delineation, high friction surface treatments, roadside improvements, etc.

To prepare for the call for projects:

  • From mid Nov. through mid Dec. 2017, Local Programs will send the cities/towns that qualify for the program a summary of crash data for 2012-2016.
  • Local Programs is holding workshops (pdf 30 kb) for agencies to learn how to develop local road safety plans (pdf 232 kb).

Funded projects: For the status of a specific project, please use our Find a local project feature.

  • 2016: 20 projects in 16 cities (pdf 263 kb), totaling $15.5 million. These funds were awarded under a temporary program called the Innovative Safety Program to fund high friction surface treatments (pdf 136 kb), intersection conflict warning systems (pdf 55 kb), compact roundabouts (pdf 142 kb), and projects to increase traffic signal operations or visibility (pdf 58 kb).
  • 2014: 30 projects in 17 cities (pdf 280 kb), totaling $23.1 million.

For more information: Contact the Traffic Services Manager .

County Safety Program

Next call for projects: No funding is available at this time. The next call for projects will be in early 2019 and in future odd numbered years.

Open to: Counties with a prioritized local road safety plan (pdf 232 kb). Other organizations may work with a county to propose/develop a project.

Funded projects: For the status of a specific project, please use our Find a local project feature.

For more information: Contact the Technical Services Manager .