Permit application drawings

Drawings are one of the most important parts of a permit application. They show what the work is, where the work is, and what the impacts from the work are. Use the information on this webpage to prepare drawings for your application for Clean Water Act Section 404 and Section 401 and Section 10 of the Rivers and Harbors Act permits. For all other permits, use the Environmental permits & approvals webpage.

All application drawings must meet the requirements on the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) Drawing Checklist (pdf 100 kb). Find sample drawings for different types of work on the Corps' Electronic Permit Guidebook - Samples & Drawing Checklist website.

Drawings should clearly show:

Existing conditions – Unless permitted as part of the work, do not include monument markers, geotech sampling points, fiber optics, and other engineering drawing. Same with property or buildings outside the project area.

Location of jurisdictional waters of the US and buffers – For help identifying jurisdictional waters go to the Determining jurisdiction of wetlands & other waters webpage. The drawings should have the wetland delineation lines, ordinary high water (OHW), mean high water (MHW), mean higher high water (MHHW), and buffers as appropriate. Include flow lines for streams.

Proposed work details (area, depths, quantities, and material types) – If you are placing fill in the same area you are excavating you need to show the depth of excavation in addition to the fill; a new ground elevation is not sufficient detail.

Impacts on the environment (permanent and temporary) from the proposed work - Keep your drawings scaled so that the work and impacts are clearly visible. There is no standard scale or orientation for permit drawings. Make sure to have a north arrow and match lines on drawings.

The plan view shows the existing conditions and the location of jurisdictional waters, proposed work, and impacts. It doesn’t have the details of the work; show that on the profile or cross sections.

The plan view shows the existing conditions and the location of jurisdictional waters, proposed work, and impacts. It doesn’t have the details of the work; show that on the profile or cross sections.

The profile or cross section also shows the existing conditions, jurisdictional waters, proposed work, and impacts. It provides more detail of the proposed work and includes depths, quantities, and material types.

The profile or cross section also shows the existing conditions, jurisdictional waters, proposed work, and impacts. It provides more detail of the proposed work and includes depths, quantities, and material types.

Impact tables

Impact tables summarize the area and volume of impacts by wetland or stream. They are an element on the drawings, in the JARPA form, mitigation plan, and NEPA document. The impact tables on the drawings must match the impact tables in the JARPA. If the impact tables in the mitigation plan and NEPA document are different than the JARPA it is okay. Explain why they are different on the JARPA form.

In addition to making sure the impact quantities are consistent between documents, use consistent naming convention or codes to identify wetlands and streams on all the documents.

Templates

Templates include recommended title blocks, colors, symbols, hatch patterns, fonts, and page layouts.  

For MicroStation - In the MicroStation Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) Menu, use the search function to find the JARPA elements. View the recommended MicroStation application drawing patterns (pdf 1.65 mb).

For AutoCAD - View the recommended AutoCAD application drawing patterns (pdf 613 kb).